John Mitchell

  I grew up with poverty, insanity and addiction but now I see the funny side of it.  I  find quirky humor in everything and the stories and observations in my blog are true events from everyday adult  life and my own childhood.  Come and join the party inside my head.

Don’t be a stranger!

John

Comments

  1. hey john this is michelles cousin jeremy in louisiana. i just read m’s post about your book which led me to your tweet. this talk about humans and the psyche’ interest me to no end. lately i have been deep (in every sense of the word) into carl jung and more specifically the shadow. i feel this crazy psychic change the more i learn about the human mind. as you may know i have come from a family with addictions and mental instability so i am on a journey to break through with knowledge. i hope to find a copy of your book. can’t wait to see more of your insights. eagerly breaking through jeremy

  2. Michael Ennis (Mike) says:

    Hey John,
    I find your remarks hysterical, but there is at least a thread of truth to everything I’ve read. I march to my own drummer, but have learned that it’s ok, since I pay my bills. I used to think I was alone in the way I process thoughts and idea’s, but you have helped make me feel a little more mainstream. Thanks.
    Mike

    • Hey Michael!

      I am so glad you enjoy the tweets. They are intended to make you laugh but also make you think. They are based in the irony of our perceived existence. I look forward to hearing more from you!

      Best, John.

  3. Humor is the only way I know how to combat an abnormal childhood… and adulthood. Glad I found your blog, John.

  4. Apparently humor is extended to all who suffer trauma in childhood and adulthood. Coming from a back ground of abuse on many levels…I was always the class clown in school….I would lose myself in movies and music……comedy…..music…movies were my lifeline….God has brought me through so much. I am grateful that I am not alone and that I can also help those who are going through it now. Thanks for your blog John……glad to meet you and look forward to reading and sharing more! God Bless!

  5. John I have been following you for awhile and really enjoy your posts. Which is why I have nominated you for the Beautiful Blogger award 🙂 http://myspokenheart.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/awards-week-id-like-to-say-thank-you/

  6. Oh…my goodness, have just read some of your beautiful blogs and now I am in tears. I know a few who would like to read you, do you publish hard copy, please. Can’t find on Google
    All the VERY best to you, triumphant soul x

    • Thank you so much Zoe! I do have a memoir of my childhood written. I’m now researching agents. 2013 will be a big year. Happy New Year and take care. John

      • Hello John, thanks for the info, and best of luck with the Agent research. Met a local writer yesterday (Brighton) who has just had a book beautifully published. His name is Jack Winter.of N. American origin
        Oh, and yes, you also know me as @kiri-latour 🙂

  7. I hear you John…growing up in an abusive, alcoholic home drove me inward to search for answers and this opened up a whole new realm of possibilities. So in a strange sense, I can honestly say that I have embraced that experience and learned a lot about myself.

  8. Hello John,
    I am just pinching myself that I found you! I too lived in a madhouse, cellar, ghostly rooms etc – with an alcoholic abusive Irish Dad – half or whole crazed family members on Dad’s side of the family who always ended up dying in our house – an empty mansion with a ballroom and no food in the larder – and I was the guilty 7 yr old opening the door to the big bad men who took the furniture away (bailiffs I now know) – having watched Dad chopping up the dining table in the garden the night before as he screamed ‘ The bastard’s won’t be after having this’. Mum was always singing hymns and waiting for her ship to come in and telling me ‘Your Dad has gone to see a man about a dog’. I was twelve before I found out I wasn’t born under a gooseberry bush with my twin!

    The only unreserved praise we ever received was the fact that we were born on VE Day. Nobody other than crazies actually discovered what was really going on in our house. Poor Dad’s repeated suicide bids and worse. Mum had to work and it was left to me to repeatedly save his life. He had an unnerving habit of falling asleep with the Daily Mirror and a ciggy and we slept in shifts. The night the house nearly burned down for the second time and I had dragged Dad out of the burning bedroom the firemen were in the kitchen and Mum was making them a cup of tea whilst singing ‘Count your blessings – count them one by one’! At this point the ceiling fell in due to the weight of the water and Mum carried on singing! I was by this time 17 and I will never forget the delighful kindly belly laughter of the firemen who chipped in with ‘And it will surprise you’! I too appreciate the ridiculous as life so often gave me fear, guilt and anger. I am writing a book which will probably be thought of as fiction by many if it ever sees the light of day.

    Mum had a blind kind of faith but was also ultra superstitious with many daft rituals. This caused me to question religion – especially as it didn’t seem to help much. I prefer the questions as some of the answers we are presently coming up with don’t sit comfortably with my vision of Jesus. We spent long holidays in Dublin where houses on one side of the street were Protestant households and the other side of the street was the Roman Catholic side. We got into terrible trouble for playing with Roman Catholic kids who were great fun. It then of course served us right when we caught their germs and had to have hot bread poultices applied to weeping sores. Brave I was not as they grew hotter and hotter and I was accused of ‘screaming like a banshee’. We were loaded on to the home flight looking like Mummy’s as we were bandaged all over! The doctor only called at the houses of the dying in my Mum’s family. Even our kindly loving aunts didn’t have a clue as they tried to battle the plague caught from playing with RC kids – had to be hidden under yards of gauze for sure. I was jolly lucky my face escaped this divine wrath! which was impetigo made all the worse with the hot milk and bread it was fed.

    I’ll stop rambling just to really thank you because you are helping me on my road to freedom.

    God bless you,

    Rosie

    • Rosie, I am thankful too that you found me! Your story is astonishing and bears so many similarities to my own. My story will be published on July 1st – The Boy Who Lived With ghosts. It’s my true story of childhood – insanity, death, poverty, abuse – the usual fun topics! The great news is that we survived and we are here. Tell me more when you get a chance. Warm wishes. John

      • John, I think I could bend your ear forever! I am placing an order for your book for definite. Prepare yourself for a best seller. Maybe I’m a kind of soul sister in a rarified form – when I progress I could email you part of a draft – even you will perhaps be surprised at the similarities. I am still somewhat plagued by strange events and inner knowings mostly connected to my sacramental healing ministry. Something of a clown for God which gets a tad draining at times. There seems to be a lot of sowing in tears of frustration before the laughter. I have a strong feeling your thoughts will help me to sit more comfortably with my edgy calling. There is quite a bit of inner child to free yet. I do find that the tapping out of the story and my free expression of childhood impressions helpful. I like it when I am caught unawares in my own laughter and have to stop typing amid convulsions.

        One amazing fact is that years after leaving the huge house that was a magnet for evil I was going through a deep crisis. I was in bed and half praying half trying to distract myself with the TV. I sort of thought I might be going potty because there right before me was the house and garden on the telly. I watched transfixed as the story unfolded. An inter-faith community had bought the house and they were showing us how they meditated together. I was crying because I still thought I was having an OTT turn. Then a guy with a wondrous voice read ‘Love bade me welcome’. I had never heard it before and the power of it just kept drawing me to deep peace. The next day I thought perhaps I had been dreaming and so I telephoned the BBC! The community had indeed bought the house and several either side of it. That evening was the beginning of my road to ordination even though my circumstances screamed ‘No’. Through contemplative prayer I gained the courage to take no inner notice of the many hurdles along the way and I no longer cared when anyone said ‘Are you mad’ and gradually folks began laughing with me rather than at me. Perhaps my biggest problem now is dealing with what others regard as sanity and a kind of order I find pretty disordered, especially in the CofE where we seem to have lost sight of the heart of faith. It’s purposeful nonetheless.

        I will ponder your tweets more deeply and see how I progress. Meanwhile I hope all goes smoothly with the publication of the book. I imagine you will be caught up in publicity and travelling so:-

        May God hold you and yours in a gentle embrace,

        Rosie

      • Rosie,

        Bend my ear all you want! Sounds like you are a kindred spirit. The book publishing process is time consuming and I have a huge following on Facebook and Twitter so everyone is very excited to see how well the book does. If it helps, I took the voice of a child in the book and looked at the world innocently (and with much humor). There is content in my book which I won’t reveal as it would spoil the story but we share a very similar upbringing. Now I live in New York, far away from the insanity of my childhood. But I do hope to help others as I pass through. Every day I am haunted by those experiences.

        Many of those ghosts still live with me.

        Warmest thoughts,

        John

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